Scotus Travel Ban Decision

The Supreme Court of the United States issued a decision on the Trump administration’s travel ban on June 26, 2018. The 5-4 decision upheld the travel ban, which prevents people from six Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

The travel ban has been divisive since it was first proposed in January 2017. President Donald Trump argued that the ban was necessary to protect the United States from terrorism, while opponents claimed that it was a discriminatory and unconstitutional ban on Muslims.

The case reached the Supreme Court in April 2018, after the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the travel ban violated the Constitution. The Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case on April 25, 2018.

In the majority opinion, written by Chief Justice John Roberts, the Supreme Court ruled that the travel ban was a lawful exercise of the president’s authority to suspend entry into the United States. The court rejected the argument that the ban was a Muslim ban, stating that the ban “has a legitimate grounding in national security concerns.”

Justice Sonia Sotomayor, in a dissenting opinion, argued that the travel ban was unconstitutional and specifically targeted Muslims. “The majority here completely sets aside the President’s charged statements about Muslims as irrelevant,” she wrote. “That holding erodes the foundational principles of religious tolerance that the Court elsewhere has so emphatically protected.”

The travel ban will now go into effect, barring people from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, and North Korea from entering the United States.

Is Executive Order 13780 still in effect?

Executive Order 13780, also known as the “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States” executive order, was signed by President Donald Trump on March 6, 2017. The order restricted travel to the United States by nationals of six Muslim-majority countries – Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. It also suspended the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program for 120 days, and indefinitely barred Syrian refugees from entering the United States.

On June 26, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court partially lifted the travel ban, allowing for the admission of nationals of the six countries with a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.” The Court provided guidance on what constitutes a bona fide relationship, stating that for individuals, a bona fide relationship is a close family relationship, such as a parent, spouse, child, or sibling. For entities, a bona fide relationship is defined as a relationship with an entity in the United States that is formal, documented, and formed in the ordinary course, rather than for the purpose of evading the Executive Order.

On October 17, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court vacated the lower court decisions that had partially lifted the travel ban and sent the cases back to the respective lower courts for further consideration in light of the guidance provided by the Supreme Court in its June 26, 2017, decision.

As of October 17, 2017, the travel ban is in effect, and nationals of the six countries are not eligible to enter the United States unless they have a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.

Is Executive Order 13769 still in effect?

Since President Trump took office in January 2017, he has issued a number of executive orders. One of these is Executive Order 13769, which was signed on January 27, 2017. This order restricts travel from seven Muslim-majority countries.

This order was met with a great deal of criticism, and on February 3, 2017, a federal judge issued a temporary restraining order to stop the order from going into effect. This order was later upheld by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Despite this, President Trump has continued to defend the order. He has even threatened to shut down the government if Congress does not fund the construction of a wall along the US-Mexico border.

So, is Executive Order 13769 still in effect?

Technically, yes, the order is still in effect. However, it is not being enforced due to the restraining order. It is possible that the order could be overturned by the Supreme Court, but that is unclear at this point.

What is the Presidential Proclamation 9645?

What is the Presidential Proclamation 9645?

On September 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed the Presidential Proclamation 9645, which imposes travel restrictions on nationals of eight countries. The countries included in the travel restrictions are Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Syria, Venezuela, Yemen, and Somalia.

The travel restrictions are in place due to the countries’ inability or unwillingness to share information needed to properly vet travelers. The restrictions vary depending on the country. For instance, nationals of Chad, Libya, and Yemen are banned from entering the United States, while Syrian nationals are banned from emigrating to the United States.

The Presidential Proclamation 9645 went into effect on October 18, 2017.

When was the travel ban enacted?

On January 27, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order imposing a travel ban on nationals from seven Muslim-majority countries. The order, which was later blocked by federal courts, barred people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen from entering the United States for 90 days. It also suspended the U.S. refugee program for 120 days and halted the admission of Syrian refugees indefinitely.

The travel ban was met with widespread protests and condemnation from both Democrats and Republicans. Critics argued that the order was unconstitutional and discriminatory against Muslims. Several federal courts issued rulings blocking the ban, stating that it violated the Constitution’s prohibition on religious discrimination.

In March, the Trump administration issued a revised travel ban, which was also blocked by federal courts. In June, the U.S. Supreme Court allowed a limited version of the ban to go into effect, pending legal challenges. The ban, which applies to nationals from six Muslim-majority countries, is currently in effect.

Is proclamation 10043 still in effect?

On October 10, 2017, President Donald Trump issued Proclamation 10043 ( “Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry Into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats”), which introduced new restrictions and limitations on travel to the United States for certain nationals of eight countries.

The countries whose nationals were subject to the new travel restrictions under Proclamation 10043 were Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Syria, Venezuela, Yemen, and Somalia.

On April 10, 2019, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit upheld a nationwide preliminary injunction blocking the implementation of the travel restrictions in Proclamation 10043.

As a result, the travel restrictions introduced by Proclamation 10043 are no longer in effect.

Is Presidential Proclamation 10052 still in effect?

Presidential Proclamation 10052, also known as the “National Emergency With Respect to Persons Who Commit, Threaten To Commit, or Support Terrorism,” was signed by President George W. Bush on September 14, 2001. The proclamation declared a national emergency in response to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

The proclamation authorizes the President to take various actions to protect the United States from terrorist attacks, including the freezing of assets of persons who commit, threaten to commit, or support terrorism.

The proclamation remained in effect under the Obama and Trump administrations. In July 2018, President Trump issued Executive Order 13823, which revoked and replaced Presidential Proclamation 10052.

Executive Order 13823, “Blocking Property of Persons Undermining the Sovereignty of the Venezuelan Government,” targets persons who are undermining the sovereignty of the Venezuelan government. It does not target persons who commit, threaten to commit, or support terrorism.

Presidential Proclamation 10052 is no longer in effect.

Is the travel ban still in effect?

The Trump administration’s travel ban, which restricts entry to the United States by nationals of several majority-Muslim countries, has been the subject of much litigation and controversy.

The original travel ban, issued as an Executive Order on January 27, 2017, was met with immediate backlash and was quickly blocked by federal courts. A revised Executive Order, issued on March 6, 2017, also faced legal challenges and was blocked by federal courts.

On June 26, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling allowing a limited version of the travel ban to go into effect. The travel ban is now in effect for nationals of Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, and Somalia. It is also in effect for North Korea and Venezuela, but only for certain government officials and their families.

The travel ban is scheduled to expire on September 24, 2017. It is not clear whether the Trump administration will renew or modify the travel ban.

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